PAST EVENTS

Painted Bride in Philadelphia on April 28, 2016: A performance piece based on Michelle Alexander’s book, The New Jim Crow”
Tickets and Info here

The Performance Garage, Philadelphia, PA
June 9, 10, 11, 2016

We were excited to perform as one of 33 dance companies at Koresh’s “Come Together” Dance Festival in Philadelphia in July 2015. We also performed at:

September 19th: “Facing East” Festival with Courtyard Dancers at Painted Bride, Philadelphia
http://paintedbride.org/events/facingeast/

September 23: Sheen Center, Bleecker Street, New York City
http://sheencenter.org/event/divine-movement-an-evening-of-sacred-dance/

September 25 & 26th: “Rivers Merge Dance Festival” at Lafayette College, Easton, PA

JULY 2015

11055320_686533611479089_1511001294822616772_oSPRING 2012:

Performing the Border is an evening of dance that builds on the grammar of two Indian classical dance forms, Bharata Natyam and Odissi, as well as a modern dance vocabulary.

This collaboration between DAKSHINA, a Bharata Natyam and modern company, and SAKSHI PRODUCTIONS, a neo-classical and contemporary Odissi dance company, explores the borders that separate dance histories and vocabularies, the classical from the modern, as well as dancers from their audience. Each piece engages with the notion of borders in a unique way and draws our attention to the constructedness of these divisions.

Our hope is to, literally and metaphorically, “perform” the borders that separate us.

Guest Artists: Akim Funk Buddha, Kalamandir Dance Company and Carrie Rohman

Friday, May 20th at 8pm Alvin Ailey Dance Theater The Joan Weill Center for Dance 405 W. 55th Street (at 9th Avenue) New York, NY 10019

Tickets: $25, and $18 for students & seniors

www.dakshina.org
www.sakshiproductions.org
212-352-3101
866-811-4111

Click here to see our postcard Performing the Border

WINTER 2012:

PRANA/BREATH PREMIERES AT ALVIN AILEY

DAKSHINA-Prana-Breath-Vertical_Layout-11-495pixels

WINTER 2010:

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We are excited to announce our upcoming performance on:

Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 8 p.m.

At: The Construction Company, 10 East 18th Street, 3rd Floor

“Performing the Border,” is a collaboration between two dance companies, Dakshina, a Bharata Natyam and modern company, and Sakshi Productions, a neo-classical and contemporary Odissi dance company.  It is an exploration of the borders that separate dance vocabularies, bodies and dancers from their audience. Our hope is to, literally and metaphorically, “perform” the borders that separate us.

Tickets are $15, $12 for students and seniors. Cash only!

Please RSVP to nsikand@yahoo.com to reserve tickets. Limited seating only.

FALL 2010:

puja incense and flowers

Sakshi Productions is a dance company that creates and performs neo-classical and contemporary works based on Odissi dance. Instead of trying to separate the ‘traditional’ from the ‘contemporary’, we use these terms as a way to guide our work rather than frame it. Our mission is to present compelling dance that draws on a diverse vocabulary but yet is anchored in Indian movement practices. We hope that each performance is a way to collaborate and create a dialogue within and beyond our shared communities and spaces.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCE:

Our first full-length Production is scheduled for Fall 2010.

IAAC Erasing Borders 2009 Dance Festival
See the NY Times review!

Here is an excerpt:

JUST TRY TO PASS BY WITHOUT BEING STUNNED

“Still, it was easy to see that the Bharatanatyam and Odissi dances on Wednesday were quite unlike the Kathak solo in many respects. Odissi (from East India) was represented by a male-female duet, “Arabhi Pallavi,” danced by Rahul Acharya (bare-chested, very slender-waisted, in blue pantaloons) and Nandini Sikand (in purple and pink) of Sakshi Productions. I adored the work’s firmly statuesque positions, its riveting use (occasionally) of the pelvis and upper torso tilted drastically sideways away from each other, its flow of gestures, its extraordinary side-to-side language of the eyes (heightened by full eyeliner for both sexes). And I loved the way — in rhythm, spatial design and mutual address — the duet kept changing. (Though the two dancers often do the same movements, or similar ones in question-and-answer dialogue, the man sometimes kneels while addressing her: it’s a compliment she may not return.)”

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2009/08/22/arts/dance/22borders.xml

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/22/arts/dance/22borders.html?_r=1&hpw#